YO YO DIET

Yo-yo dieting or yo-yo effect, also known as weight cycling, is a term coined by kelly D.Brownell at Yale University, in reference to the cyclical loss and gain of weight, resembling the up-down motion of a Yo Yo. In this process, the dieter is initially successful in the pursuit of Weight Loss but is unsuccessful in maintaining the loss long-term and begins to gain the weight back. The dieter then seeks to lose the regained weight, and the cycle begins again.

Causes

 The reasons for yo-yo dieting are varied but often include embarking upon a hypocaloric diet that was initially too extreme. At first the dieter may experience elation at the thought of weight loss and pride in their rejection of food.Over time, however, the limits imposed by such extreme diets cause effects such as depression or fatigue that make the diet impossible to sustain. Ultimately, the dieter reverts to their old eating habits.  now with the added emotional effects of failing to lose weight by restrictive diet. Such an emotional state leads many people to eating more than they would have before dieting, causing them to rapidly regain weight.


HEALTH SERVICE POINT

Making an appointment

The Health Service is open Monday to Friday, 8.45 am to 5.00 pm on all days the University is open.
The Health Service provides an appointment based system for the convenience of patients and to minimise waiting time. In response to user feedback and to decrease telephony traffic and lengthy call queues, we have introduced an online booking system.
Appointments can also be made by calling.

Requirements for patients

Patients are required to bring their relevant documentation;

  • Student or staff card
  • Local students or staff members please bring you Medicare card.
  • If you are still on your parents’ Medicare Card you can apply for one of your own at any Medicare office – all you require is your birth certificate, passport or drivers licence. For further information please refer to the Medicare Website..
  • International students or staff members, please bring your Bupa or Allianz Global OSHC member cards or information pertaining to other medical insurance provider.
  • You can also authorise your medical records to be transferred from your previous doctor to a doctor at the University Health Service. This way your full medical history can be available to the doctor at our service.
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Top 10 best health tips

1. Breaths

Take 10 deep breaths filling air from the diaphragm up and exhaling completely, whenever you feel stressed.

2.water

  Drink 3 liters of good clean water everyday in addition to any other beverage you have

3.Eating Habits

Eat something raw from the plant kingdom at every meal and make it the biggest part of the meal: vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains should be the bulk of what you eat.

4.Time of Sleeping

 Go to sleep at the same time and get up at same time 6-or-more days of the week. Get at least 8 hours of sleep daily.

5.Supplementary Food

 Take a clinically validated, whole food based supplement (www.juiceplus.com)

  6.Process Of Eating Food

 Eat processed foods sparingly, less than once a week if possible

  7.Breakfast Time

 Make breakfast and lunch your biggest meals, preferably between 10 am and 4 pm when your digestions is strongest. Try to eat these two meals at the same time each day; your digestive organs will get the benefit of expecting to go to work on a schedule. This helps tremendously with proper digestion and absorption of nutrients.

  8.Important of Fresh air

  Get outside and move a little bit each day. Fresh air and deep breathing are far more important than getting a workout.

  9.Green Drink

 Start each day with a Green Drink.

  10.Thinking

Think good, healthy thoughts.

12 best diet tips to help you lose weight

1. Don’t skip breakfast

Skipping breakfast won’t help you lose weight. You could miss out on essential nutrients and you may end up snacking more throughout the day because you feel hungry. Check out five healthy breakfasts.

2. Eat regular meals

Eating at regular times during the day helps burn calories at a faster rate. It also reduces the temptation to snack on foods high in fat and sugar. Find out more about eating heathily.

3. Eat plenty of fruit and veg

Fruit and veg are low in calories and fat, and high in fibre – three essential ingredients for successful weight loss. They also contain plenty of vitamins and minerals. Read up on getting your 5 A DAY.

4. Get more active

Being active is key to losing weight and keeping it off. As well as providing numerous health benefits, exercise can help burn off the excess calories you can’t cut through diet alone. Find an activity you enjoy and are able to fit into your routine.

5. Drink plenty of water

People sometimes confuse thirst with hunger. You can end up consuming extra calories when a glass of water is really what you need.

6. Eat high-fibre foods

Foods containing lots of fibre can help keep you to feel full, which is perfect for losing weight. Fibre is only found in food from plants, such as fruit and veg, oats, wholegrain bread, brown rice and pasta, and beans, peas and lentils.

7. Read food labels

Knowing how to read food labels can help you choose healthier options. Use the calorie information to work out how a particular food fits into your daily calorie allowance on the weight loss plan. Find out more about reading food labels.

8. Use a smaller plate

Using smaller plates can help you eat smaller portions. By using smaller plates and bowls, you may be able to gradually get used to eating smaller portions without going hungry. It takes about 20 minutes for the stomach to tell the brain it’s full, so eat slowly and stop eating before you feel full.

9. Don’t ban foods

Don’t ban any foods from your weight loss plan, especially the ones you like. Banning foods will only make you crave them more. There’s no reason you can’t enjoy the occasional treat as long as you stay within your daily calorie allowance.

10. Don’t stock junk food 

To avoid temptation, try to not stock junk food – such as chocolate, biscuits, crisps and sweet fizzy drinks – at home. Instead, opt for healthy snacks, such as fruit, unsalted rice cakes, oat cakes, unsalted or unsweetened popcorn, and fruit juice.

11. Cut down on alcohol

A standard glass of wine can contain as many calories as a piece of chocolate. Over time, drinking too much can easily contribute to weight gain. Find out more about the calories in alcohol.

12. Plan your meals

Try to plan your breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks for the week, making sure you stick to your calorie allowance. You may find it helpful to make a weekly shopping list.

Latest 10 health tips for women

1. Zap your stress.

“The biggest issue I see in most of my patients is that they have too much on their plates and want to juggle it all. Stress can have significant health consequences, from infertility to higher risks of depression, anxiety, and heart disease. Find the stress-reduction method that works for you and stick with it.”

2. Stop dieting.

“Eating healthy doesn’t mean you have to forgo your favorite glass of wine or a piece of chocolate cake now and then. The key is moderation. Get a mix of lean proteins, healthy fats, smart carbs, and fiber.”

3. Don’t “OD” on calcium.

“Too much absorbed calcium can increase the risk of kidney stones and may even increase the risk of heart disease. If you’re under 50, shoot for 1,000 milligrams per day, while over-50 women should be getting 1,200 milligrams per day mainly through diet — about three servings of calcium-rich foods such as milk, salmon, and almonds.”

4. Do more than cardio.

“Women need a mix of cardio and resistance or weight-bearing exercise at least three to five times a week to help prevent osteoporosis, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Exercise also promotes good self-image, which is really important to a woman’s mental health.”

5. Think about fertility.

“While many women have no problem getting pregnant in their late 30s and even into their early 40s, a woman’s fertility may start to decline as early as 32. So if you want to have kids, talk to your doctor about options, like freezing your eggs.”

6. Appreciate birth control.

“Birth control gets a bad rap, but not only can it keep you from getting pregnant before you’re ready, studies show it can lower the risk of uterine and ovarian cancer as well as regulate your cycle.”

 7. See your doctor every year.

Make sure you get a Pap test to check for cervical cancer every 3 years if you are 21 or older. If you are 30-65, you can get both a Pap test and HPV test every 5 years. Older than that, you may be able to stop testing if your doctor says you are low risk. If you are sexually active and have a higher risk for STDs, get tests for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis yearly. Take an HIV test at least once, more frequently if you’re at risk. Don’t skip your yearly checkup. Your doctor needs to annually assess many other issues such as potential infection, your need for contraception, and sexual complaints.”

8. Have good sex.

“Sex reduces stress and may lower the risk of chronic disease — but only if you enjoy it. If anything prevents you from sexual fulfillment, such as dryness or pain, talk to your doctor to find a solution.”

 9. Get more sleep.

“Sleep needs differ, but if you have trouble getting out of bed, tire easily, or have trouble concentrating, you likely aren’t getting enough. Recent studies suggest this can put you at greater risk of heart disease and psychological problems.”

10. Consider genetic testing.

“Doctors can now screen people with a family history of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and chronic diseases to assess their risk — and then consider preventive measures. Talk to your doctor.”